"High level of danger. Your account was under attack" - Remove Scam
THREAT REMOVAL

“High level of danger. Your account was under attack” – Remove Scam

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Are you seeing a “High level of danger. Your account was under attack” email in your inbox that appears to be sent from your own email account? Do not worry as this is just another version of a quite widespread sextortion scam claiming that you have been recorded while watching adult content.

I made a video showing how you satisfy yourself in the left half of the screen, and in the right half you see the video that you watched,” the scam claims. You are then instructed to “transfer the amount of $748” to the scammers’ bitcoin address so that the video is not shared with your contacts.

Everything stated in this email is a depiction of scareware tactics which only seek to strip you of your finances. Continue reading to learn why you received this scam message, and what to do to avoid such scams in the future.

Threat Summary

Name"High level of danger. Your account was under attack"
TypeEmail Scam Message, Spoofing, Sextortion Scam
Short DescriptionA scam that tries to scare you into paying an extortion for a supposed breach of your email account. The scammer also claims that he has recorded a video of you while watching adult content.
SymptomsYou receive an email message that tries to trick you into thinking that your email account got compromised, and there are recordings of you watching adult content. The email appears to be sent from your email account.
Distribution MethodEmail Spam Messages, Suspicious Sites
Detection Tool See If Your System Has Been Affected by "High level of danger. Your account was under attack"

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User ExperienceJoin Our Forum to Discuss "High level of danger. Your account was under attack".

"High level of danger. Your account was under attack" – Update October 2019

According to recent reports "High level of danger. Your account was under attack" has been detected to still be active on users Macs and to be widespread via the most often used means of replication. "High level of danger. Your account was under attack" can also be seen in new and different forms since its creators have attempted to update it in various different ways.

“High level of danger. Your account was under attack” Email Scam – Details

Here is the full text of the “High level of danger. Your account was under attack” scam message:

Hello!

As you may have noticed, I sent you an email from your account.
This means that I have full access to your device.

I’ve been watching you for a few months now.
The fact is that you were infected with malware through an adult site that you visited.

If you are not familiar with this, I will explain.
Trojan Virus gives me full access and control over a computer or other device.
This means that I can see everything on your screen, turn on the camera and microphone, but you do not know about it.

I also have access to all your contacts and all your correspondence.

Why your antivirus did not detect malware?
Answer: My malware uses the driver, I update its signatures every 4 hours so that your antivirus is silent.

I made a video showing how you satisfy yourself in the left half of the screen, and in the right half you see the video that you watched.
With one click of the mouse, I can send this video to all your emails and contacts on social networks.
I can also post access to all your e-mail correspondence and messengers that you use.

If you want to prevent this,
transfer the amount of $748 to my bitcoin address (if you do not know how to do this, write to Google: “Buy Bitcoin”).

My bitcoin address (BTC Wallet) is: 13nsNBfoVwXDHY4puRD1AHjARbomKhsxEL

After receiving the payment, I will delete the video and you will never hear me again.
I give you 50 hours (more than 2 days) to pay.
I have a notice reading this letter, and the timer will work when you see this letter.

Filing a complaint somewhere does not make sense because this email cannot be tracked like my bitcoin address.
I do not make any mistakes.

If I find that you have shared this message with someone else, the video will be immediately distributed.

Best regards!

The “High level of danger. Your account was under attack” scam message appears to be sent from your own email address. This is an indication of spoofing – your email has been spoofed. The approach is typically utilized by such scams to make you believe that your email account was hacked.

What is spoofing? In fact, spoofing is a method that has been used by spam operators for years. In the past, spammers got hold of email lists with the help of computers infected by malware. Nowadays, phishing has evolved to such an extent that spammers can phish carefully chosen victims with messages that look like they came from friends, trustworthy sources, or even their own account.

The tools that enable email spoofing are surprisingly easy to get. All you need is a working SMTP server which is a server that can send email, and a mailing software appropriate for the task.

Truth be told, any mail server can be configured to send from a specific domain, and there are even websites that will let you send emails using any email address for free. It should be noted that these methods leave traces that give spoofing away. That’s why it is important to learn how to read email headers.

Note that showing your email headers depends on the email provider. For Gmail, open the email and click on the three vertical dots next to the reply arrow and select “Show Original” to revise the details.

Other reasons for receiving scam messages such as the “Your account is being used by another person!” scam include your email being compromised in a data breach, or harvested along with thousands of other emails. However, the chance that your system was indeed infected by malware also exists.

The last option should not be overlooked, especially if you have opened a suspicious email attachment or clicked on an unknown link. Phishing can lead to various outcomes, including the exposure of personal accounts.

If you have interacted with a phishing message and opened an attachment or clicked on a link, your accounts may have been compromised, email accounts included. Your financial details may be at risk, as well. So it may be a good idea to scan your system for spyware or malware.

A simple solution

Since all recent extortion-based scams, such as the “Your account is being used by another person!” scam, are relying on purported recordings of the recipient watching adult content, simply cover up your laptop’s camera. This may sound silly but knowing that your camera is covered leaves no place for you to worry, regardless of the scammer’s claims.

Another simple thing you can do to avoid email harvesting (where scammers and third parties harvest email addresses in bulk) is the so-called email address munging, or simply changing the “@” sign into “at” and the “.” into “dot”. This is especially valid for individuals with business emails that are visible to the entire internet.

And once again, no matter how persuasive the “High level of danger. Your account was under attack” email you received sounds, don’t fall for it because it is a scam.

Remove “High level of danger. Your account was under attack” Scam

To remove the “High level of danger. Your account was under attack” scam, you should simply delete the email message. However, there is always the option that you were indeed breached or hacked. If you suspect this to be true, you can refer to the step-by-step removal instructions provided below this article. In case you cannot get rid of any files related to the “High level of danger. Your account was under attack” scam or find out other malicious ones, you should locate and remove any leftover malware pieces using an advanced anti-malware tool.

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Milena Dimitrova

An inspired writer and content manager who has been with SensorsTechForum for 4 years. Enjoys ‘Mr. Robot’ and fears ‘1984’. Focused on user privacy and malware development, she strongly believes in a world where cybersecurity plays a central role. If common sense makes no sense, she will be there to take notes. Those notes may later turn into articles! Follow Milena @Milenyim

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