GhostMiner Virus — How to Fully Remove It from Your PC
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GhostMiner Virus — How to Fully Remove It from Your PC

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This article has been created in order to explain what is the GhostMiner Trojan and how to remove this malware completely from your computer.

The GhostMiner virus is a stealth Trojan that can infect computer networks and infiltrate both end users and enterprise targets. It takes advantage of the available computer resources in order to generate income for the operators.

Threat Summary

NameGhostMiner
TypeTrojan Horse/CryptoCurrency Miner
Short DescriptionSilently infects your computer after which begins to mine for cryptocurrencies via a fake executable process..
SymptomsA very high resource usage and unusual operating system interaction.
Distribution MethodMalicious web links, Malicious Files, Malicious E-Mails
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GhostMiner – How Does It Infect

The GhostMiner Trojan can be distributed using various strategies. Depending on the active hacker campaign the criminals behind it may choose a single strategy or launch several ones at once.

The GhostMiner virus files can be spread as executables files via email messages. The most common method is to insert them as hyperlinks in the body contents. In order to coerce the intended targets into falling victim to the virus the hackers may use various social engineering tricks. For example the message may be pose as an update notification or a software issue alert that asks the users to install an update or application. In related cases the strains can also be accompanied by direct attachments. Related cases include the following:

  • Infected Documents — The GhostMiner virus can be embedded as a script in hacker-modified documents. They can be of different types such as presentations, rich text documents and spreadsheets. The infection begins if the users agree to the notification prompt asking them to run the built-in scripts (macros). If this is done the malware is downloaded from a remote site and executed on the local computer.
  • Hacker-modified Setup Files — The hackers the threat take legitimate installers of famous software with the intent to scam the intended targets. In the most common case the victim applications are free or trial versions of system utilities, creative apps or computer games.

The GhostMiner malware files can also be spread on hacker-controlled sites. They usually take the legitimate graphics and text from famous portals and create copies of them. Familiar sounding domains are often used to scam the computer users into thinking that they have accessed the vendor’s site or a legitimate download sites. This practice can also be seen on file sharing networks such as BitTorrent.

Another method used by the hackers to distribute the GhostMiner virus is the use of browser hijackers. They represent malware browser plugins that seek to redirect the victim users to a specific hacker-controlled site. They are usually made compatible with the most popular browsers: Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Internet Explorer, Opera, Safari and Microsoft Edge. After they have changed several important default settings (default homepage, search engine and new tabs page) they can deliver the GhostMiner virus to the infected hosts.

Miner instances can also be acquired from web scripts. Examples include all sorts of banners, ads and pop-ups that may also inject themselves to legitimate sites via various ad networks.

GhostMiner – More Information and Analysis

The GhostMiner virus is a dangerous cryptocurrency Trojan that has recently been spotted in a worldwide attack. According to the security researchers that analyzed the case the threat is labeled as “critical”. The threat has been found to be able to spread on a global scale using a “fileless” infiltration.

Such viruses have the main goal of infecting the target computers with resource-intensive code that performs complex calculations. As a result the criminal operators generate profit based on the work done. The actual infiltration happens using a several step process that can be further modified according to the individual targets and the relevant attack campaign. The attack begins with the initial infection phase that relies on several PowerShell evasion frameworks. They bypass the usual operating system protection and may also act against common security software: anti-virus programs, sandbox or debug environments and virual machine hosts. The module is designed to bypass or entirely remove the threat. In certain cases the malware may choose to delete itself if it finds that it cannot infect the target computer in a stealth way.

The security experts state that before its signatures were identified none of the major anti-virus vendors were able to pick up the infections using the routine heuristics real-time scan. The reason for this is the fact that the infection happens in memory only — no file interactions are done.

The captured samples have been found to begin the attacks with an information gathering module. It generates a profile of the victim computers based on the acquired data: hardware components and installed software. The researchers uncovered that some of the samples acquired from the search for the presence of the following servers and tools: Oracle WebLogic, MSSQL and phpMyAdmin. This likely means that the malware directed mainly against enterprise networks rather than individual users. It appears that one of the main goals of the threat is to compromise the Oracle WebLogic application. This is done using the reported CVE-2017-10271 advisory. It reads the following:

Vulnerability in the Oracle WebLogic Server component of Oracle Fusion Middleware (subcomponent: WLS Security). Supported versions that are affected are 10.3.6.0.0, 12.1.3.0.0, 12.2.1.1.0 and 12.2.1.2.0. Easily exploitable vulnerability allows unauthenticated attacker with network access via T3 to compromise Oracle WebLogic Server. Successful attacks of this vulnerability can result in takeover of Oracle WebLogic Server. CVSS 3.0 Base Score 7.5 (Availability impacts). CVSS Vector: (CVSS:3.0/AV:N/AC:L/PR:N/UI:N/S:U/C:N/I:N/A:H).

The performed network analysis on the GhostMiner virus reveals that the virus engine constantly probes the IP address of the target machine which leads to the creation of numerous TCP connections until a vulnerability is identified. In order to avoid the port scan detection the hackers encode the bogus messages using Base64. It has been found that malware HTTP request that reference popular web services are used to fool the administrators. A frequent listing is the popular Chinese QQ Internet service. This lead is attributed to the notion that the hacker or criminal collective behind GhostMiner may be from China. e

After the virus has infiltrated the target system it runs a computer audit which seeks to find if there are any other miners installed. If such are found they are entirely removed from the targets.

The GhostMiner virus has the ability to create numerous processes and spawn its own threads using various privilege levels, including administrative ones. As a result it can be used for other criminal activity including the following:

  • Data Theft — An information gathering module can be used to generate a profile of the victims. The extracted strings can directly expose the users identity by collecting data such as the victims name, address, phone number, passwords and account credentials.
  • Additional Malware Delivery — The virus can be used to deliver other malware.
  • System Changes — The GhostMiner virus can lead to dangerous system modifications including Windows Registry changes, a removal of the possibility to enter into boot recovery and etc.

Remove GhostMiner Effectively from Windows

In order to fully get rid of this cryptocurrency miner Trojan, we advise you to follow the removal instructions underneath this article. They are made so that they help you to isolate and then delete the GhostMiner Trojan either manually or automatically. If manual removal represents difficulty for you, experts always advise to perform the removal automatically by running an anti-malware scan via specific software on your PC. Such anti-malware program aims to make sure that the GhostMiner is fully gone and your Windows OS stays safe against any future malware infections.

Note! Your computer system may be affected by GhostMiner and other threats.
Scan Your PC with SpyHunter
SpyHunter is a powerful malware removal tool designed to help users with in-depth system security analysis, detection and removal of threats such as GhostMiner.
Keep in mind, that SpyHunter’s scanner is only for malware detection. If SpyHunter detects malware on your PC, you will need to purchase SpyHunter’s malware removal tool to remove the malware threats. Read our SpyHunter 5 review. Click on the corresponding links to check SpyHunter’s EULA, Privacy Policy and Threat Assessment Criteria.

To remove GhostMiner follow these steps:

1. Boot Your PC In Safe Mode to isolate and remove GhostMiner files and objects
2. Find files created by GhostMiner on your PC

IMPORTANT!
Before starting the Automatic Removal below, please boot back into Normal mode, in case you are currently in Safe Mode.
This will enable you to install and use SpyHunter 5 successfully.

Use SpyHunter to scan for malware and unwanted programs

3. Scan for malware and unwanted programs with SpyHunter Anti-Malware Tool

Martin Beltov

Martin graduated with a degree in Publishing from Sofia University. As a cyber security enthusiast he enjoys writing about the latest threats and mechanisms of intrusion.

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