Mobile Malware 2015: Ransomware, Tor and Porn Apps - How to, Technology and PC Security Forum | SensorsTechForum.com
THREAT REMOVAL

Mobile Malware 2015: Ransomware, Tor and Porn Apps

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

mobile malware-infographic-blue-coatThe end of the year is near, and it’s time for some (scary) annual reports on cybercrime. Let’s see what the numbers are showing in terms of mobile security.

As it turns out, mobile ransomware has turned into the most popular mobile threat. In fact, it is as dangerous as computer ransomware. Blue Coat has just released an annual paper on the matter. Blue Coat’s report has focused on the top threats that affect mobile devices. It’s not surprising that mobile malware is rising, as we’ve become very dependent on our phones and store lots of valuable information on them. Information leakage is a great threat concern as well, along with potentially unwanted software (PUS).

Who are the guys at Blue Coat and what are they doing?

Blue Coat is a leading company in enterprise security, providing on-premise, hybrid and cloud-based solutions for protecting web connectivity, combating advanced threats, and responding to security breaches. (from their official website)

2015 vs 2014

According to many security sources, the prime infection source in 2014 was through mobile advertisements. Back then, bad mobile ads had an infection rate of almost 20%. In 2015 things have changed. The most threatening actors are pornography applications and websites, leading the notorious rankings with 36.13% of infections. In comparison, in 2013 porn malware had a share of 20%.

According to Blue Coat, many pornography applications are employed to bundle Trojan components in their code. By downloading a compromised app or visiting a porn page, the user is infecting his mobile device and compromising all the information stored on it.

Mobile Ransomware on the Rise

Few years ago, mobile ransomware hadn’t evolved to the point of being a prevalent mobile threat. In 2015, however, it has turned to be the most popular mobile infection. The uptake is most likely due to the fact that ‘desktop ransomware’ (Cryptowall, CryptoLocker, etc) has proven to be unbeatable and has generated enormous income for its authors.

mobile-ransomware-safety-tips

According to Blue Coat, the last few months especially have seen an uptake in ransomware infections on mobile phones. Even if earlier forms of mobile ransomware were quite easy to remove, the latest versions are not. Security researchers have closely observed this type of mobile threat. Gathered data leads to several conclusions:

  • Mobile ransomware also has file encrypting capabilities.
  • Mobile ransomware can connect to command & control servers.
  • Mobile ransomware may act as a rootkit and can be very persistent.
  • Mobile ransomware lockscreens have become harder to remove.

Other Similarities with PC Ransomware

For starters, recent mobile ransomware pieces have been using Tor. Just imagine what the numbers will be in 2016, if ransomware, mobile porn apps, and the Tor network continue their ‘collaboration’.

Using Tor for malicious mobile operations is not that surprising. After all, Tor gives hackers anonymity by obscuring their real destination of the ransom payment. What usually happens is that the victim of a mobile ransomware usually runs out of time before ‘getting up to speed on the intricacies of Tor’, as researchers at Blue Coat point out. As a result, the deadline to pay clicks away and the victim’s files are gone for good.

Researchers at Blue Point have also created an illustrative infographic on mobile malware – parts of it are published in our article. Click on the link to see its full version.

My Phone Was Just Infected with Ransomware. What Should I Do?

In case your Android mobile device has fallen victim to a form of vicious ransomware, you can refer to our article just below. There, we have explained what to do to rid your device from the unwelcome presence:

Remove Mobile Ransomware from My Android Device – Android/Lockerpin.A Ransomware

Milena Dimitrova

An inspired writer and content manager who has been with SensorsTechForum for 4 years. Enjoys ‘Mr. Robot’ and fears ‘1984’. Focused on user privacy and malware development, she strongly believes in a world where cybersecurity plays a central role. If common sense makes no sense, she will be there to take notes. Those notes may later turn into articles!

More Posts

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

Share on Facebook Share
Loading...
Share on Twitter Tweet
Loading...
Share on Google Plus Share
Loading...
Share on Linkedin Share
Loading...
Share on Digg Share
Share on Reddit Share
Loading...
Share on Stumbleupon Share
Loading...